Transitions

Extracted.  It’s been all about Extracted for the last year.  It was my first copy edit, the first time I worked with an editor…basically it was my first everything.  Now I’m transitioning onto book two of the series.

When I wrote Extracted, it was all fun and games.  Now it feels like work.  Not because of pressure anyone has put on me, just something internal.  I feel the transition to book two is hard because I pulled out all the stops I could on book one. In book one, I had the luxury of creating a world and I could do pretty much whatever I wanted, as long as Sherry approved it.  Now I’m limited to the world I’ve created in book two. I could write something and knock the socks off my editor.  Now I HAVE to knock my editor socks off.  Rediscovering new and creative ways to continue on with the story and make it fun is a difficult transition. As I write, I wonder if I’m giving them what they want.

I guess the real issue is that I surprised myself with Extracted and didn’t realize I could write for more than just a hobby. I’m afraid I’ll let Sherry, my new fans, or everyone at Spencer Hill Press down.

I’ve been through so many transitions in my life.  Single to married, zero kids to four kids, bought and sold lots of homes, heck I moved three times in 2012, but this transition seems to be the hardest.  I know once I get past this horrible head game that I’m playing with myself, the words will flow.  But it’s like Theodore Roosevelt said, “Nothing in the world is worth having or worth doing unless it means effort, pain, difficulty…”

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About tylerhjolley

I was born in the era of the Star Wars and the Indiana Jones sagas. I’ve been enamored with science fiction and adventure stories ever since. In order to support my hobby of writing I decided to pursue dentistry. I graduated from Nova Southeastern University School of Dental Medicine in 2002. I then completed a four year orthodontic and periodontic residency at the University of Pennsylvania. In June 2006, I opened a private practice, Jolley Smiles, in Grand Junction, Colorado. I now have a total of four offices located in Grand Junction, Fruita, Montrose and Delta. Snowboarding, mountain biking, road biking, fly fishing, bird hunting, camping, hiking, and backpacking are the things I enjoy doing with my family. I also enjoy lecturing internationally on temporary orthodontic implants. Some of my journal articles have also been published in the Journal of Clinical Orthodontics. However, my true passion has always been fiction writing. When life gets stressful I escapes to unseen worlds to find relaxation. My career has been the vehicle to let me write without worry. I find inspiration from most of my adolescent patients. I continue to dream up fun and thrilling books to this day.

14 thoughts on “Transitions

  1. I think it will be phenomenal, period. Don’t underestimate yourself. And the transition will make you stronger and you will grow so much it will be unparalleled! 🙂

    • Brooke, you are the best. You don’t know how much your encouragement means to me. Where would this series even be without you and your support?!? If I haven’t said it lately, thank you again for being so awesome.

  2. Before I sold a book and had a few mss. gathering dust under the bed, my friends used to console me by saying that at least when I did finally sell, I’d be ready to roll and ready to write efficiently to deadlines… I already knew about the pressure of book 2, about rejections, about the need to improve each piece. At the time, that seemed like reallllly poor consolation . But I get it now. Luckily, you have an amazing network to make sure you stay on the straight and narrow. I’m so impressed with the editors at SHP and the eye they have for molding fiction into the best possible direction. Good luck, Tyler! – Joanne for J.K.

    • Thanks Joanne, the editors at SHP are the best. I know they’ll help point me in the right direction if I’m way off, but I just don’t want to let them down. With that said, I know how blessed to be working with them. I’m glad you’ve also had an awesome experience with them.

  3. I don’t think you have to worry about letting anyone down, Tyler. I haven’t read Extracted yet (I didn’t get an ARC), but I hear it’s Phenomenal! But, I do understand the pressures of writing a second book in a series. I’m currently working on the sequel to PODs and I’m constantly looking at the reviews of PODs and thinking…am I going in the right direction? Are they going to accept this new relationship? This new government? The detail about the virus and on and on.

    And beyond that, I’m working on a young adult urban fantasy that I’ve trashed and rewritten at least four times. My husband pulls each one out of the computer’s recycle bin and saves them. He tells me they’re good, but I feel the pressure from PODs and I’m just not sure it measures up. Can I write something worthwhile again? Who knows? I’m a little scared I can’t. But I’m to stubborn not to try and find out. 🙂

    So I understand your growing pains. I think that many new authors go through them. We have to learn to trust in our ability as a writer and own our talent, something that can be very hard to do. But you have talent and you will come out on the other side of this with a book two that is going to knock everyone socks off…including yours!!

    Michelle 🙂

  4. Sometimes success can be as much of a challenge as failure. Writing a sequel can be a challenge; I’ve personally been having difficulties with Catalyst in the Crucible, Book Three of the Catalyst Chronicles. I’m just focusing on getting the story right and not worrying what anyone else thinks of it. Hope this helps.

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